KristolTony
Copyright©2018 Tony Kristol

Airborne

Back-in-the day

Airborne School is broken into three one-week phases: Ground Week, Tower Week, and Jump Week. At Airborne school, soldiers will train alongside Regular Army officers and enlisted men and women, as well as members of the other armed services, and jump from Air Force aircraft including the C-130 Hercules and C-17  Globemaster. The year I attended (1965), was the  beginning of the buildup of troops in Vietnam. There were over 700 students in my class. The class was composed of volunteers from all branches of the military. We had 4 from the Air Force, a half dozen or more  Navy Seals and a few marines. Back then the first five qualifying jumps were made from an  Air Force C-119, known as a "Flying Boxcar." The course was 3 weeks long. The first two weeks we learned how to properly exit the aircraft, developed skills required to navigate the parachute and how to properly execute a Parachute Landing Fall (PLF). The training was strenuous, very physical for everyone except the Navy Seals who came to the school deep into their own training and very much in shape. There was an abundance of verbal abuse from the Army instructors. There was a pay bonus for all who made it thru the school and were put on jump status by their branch of service. $110 a month for officers and $55 a month for enlisted personnel, which I thought was extremely unfair as the enlisted men were loaded down with most of the  communications equipment.
KristolTony
Copyright©2018 Tony Kristol

Airborne

Back-in-the day